Whatever It Takes…Write

Not soccer gear, just a knee-support.

Friday I went to the doctor and ended up in the hospital. Two things I hate the most. Apparently I passed out on the sidewalk (just “this close” to leaving the dreaded, but ever so helpful, doctor) and woke up with nurses holding me, an ambulance on the way, and a friend talking to whoever was holding my feet. “Tell us your name.” I tried to get the words out but couldn’t. Finally, with much effort, “Lee” from a long distance away but I finally said it. My friend helped them with the rest as the sirens got closer. (I very much dislike ambulances, more than the other two listed above; so Friday was not a banner day.)

They moved me onto a gurney, though I can only tell you this from what my friend filled me in on. Asked me tons of questions as they stuck needles in me. I woke up in the ER with needles all over me and bags hanging. No George Clooney though. Darn the luck.

Long and short, my boyfriend came from NY to take care of me bringing me five more books to add to my already bursting library. (God love him!)  I am laying in bed with arms draped over my keyboard wanting so much to grab my journal of writing but cannot twist to get it. (My boyfriend had to catch a plane home as of yesterday.) And one of my dear friends is sick herself from staying with me every second in the hospital and walking through the rain in the dark and cold. (I am so grateful for the friends I have. They are a testament to the good in humans.)

But I am writing nonetheless. Why? Because I have to. It is what I do. I’m not much of a t.v. person and I must write. There are no excuses for me. But I am hard on myself and crack the whip. Not so with others. When people share things with me, I try to see it from their vantage point. What is keeping you from writing? Tell me and we will work on it together. What is your biggest hurdle? Let’s talk.

 

Post Script: I am going to add to this. Whatever it takes, read. To become a great writer, you must write consistently every day. Whether it’s on your MS or website. My joints are shot and there is no chance of replacing them as the process is ongoing-not osteoporosis  That is, each cell is working against myself. So I must work twice as hard to write as the average writer,  not person, the average writer. And I do this. Whether you see me here or not. I am writing THROUGH the pain. Now if I can do that, so can you.

However, to write more you must fuel your writing with reading. Just like a car cannot run without fuel, neither can your mind expand and generate new thoughts without putting fuel into those synapses. You MUST read to write. Read often and widely. Not just what you like, but what makes you expand your horizons. Please tell me what you are reading right now. Comment below.

16 thoughts on “Whatever It Takes…Write

  1. Amit Amin

    Thanks for sharing! I hope you feel better 🙂

    My biggest obstacle is that, usually, I don’t ask – how can I write something unique, interesting, or valuable, but how can I write something more unique, more interesting, or more valuable [than the best].

    This high standard of quality serves me well, but the problem is that I get too ambitious, push myself too much, get lazy, and then repeat. Well, until writing that sentence I didn’t realize that’s what I do. Interesting…

    1. leejtyler Post author

      Thank you, Amit. First, the last part of your message means so much to me as I am meant to be a sounding board for writers and just the process that occurred in you to awareness is so important! Secondly, I recognize a very high standard that you set for yourself (although you cover that up possibly with a laissez fair attitude for the world, I may be off the mark there but that’s my feeling). There is a sort of fear of failure in all of us that sometimes halts our progress. In your case, you function at such a high level it wouldn’t be fear of outside occurrences, but those within you; that you didn’t meet your high standard; how could anyone if the bar is set so high (“better than the best”). Well, you already figured that out which is the beauty of writing about our writing. (So ‘meta’, right 😉 but true.) Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts. Love it!!

  2. Joel Zaslofsky

    Holy smokes! What a story Lee!
    I’m glad you’ve recovered a bit. After reading something like this, any excuse I have to not create (writing’s only part of what I do) seems to be trivial. I know you didn’t intend to give someone like me a kick in the pants, but I’m going to save it for another day when I need it.
    Want to know my biggest hurdle though? Sometimes I’m too busy curating to get to creating. I guess if I had to choose a problem to have it would be that. But it can be disruptive.

    1. leejtyler Post author

      Hi there! How is the challenge going? Sorry I couldn’t participate but would love to here the details. I hate to break it to you, hun, but that’s a classic avoidance behavior. And all of us (as in the writing community) do it. Are you curating what you already have written? If so, not so bad. If your muse is not by your side, the next best thing is to edit, pair, substitute, voice your dialogue, etc. Use your left brain instead of your right (creative) brain until the right side (no pun intended) is ready. If you haven’t read it lately, re-read “How to Keep and Feed a Muse” by Ray Bradbury.
      See you on the a-listers (still a bit shakey so might take a day), but do let me know of the challenge.

  3. kmr4988

    I’m sorry to hear you spent your weekend in the hospital, Lee. I hope you’e feeling better and will enjoy this upcoming one a bit more. =)

    My writing challenge? Oh, where to begin! 😉 Right now, mine is not knowing what to work on. I have 40 pages of a fiction novel (but don’t really know how to *write* a fiction novel), part of an e-book and of course, blog posts to write. It’s hard to know which to go with.

    1. leejtyler Post author

      You are so kind, always, in whatever you comment on. Thank you. Luckily it wasn’t the whole weekend! I don’t think I’ve been in that much pain or as sick in well, it kicked me outta my game. But I appreciate your thoughts. Will see you on our club soon!!

    2. leejtyler Post author

      I wanted to follow up as your comment about not knowing how to write fiction struck me. Darling, you are already writing and that’s a step above. I often times, when feeling pulled in all directions turn the ‘to do’ brain off and read, whether it’s reading other writers processes, thought-provoking articles (which usually stir me to write), or some amazing fiction/literary novels. There is an inner dialogue we have with whatever we are reading. Sometimes we push ourselves to ‘finish’ that the precious middle ground of thought and action are halted. If we step back to absorb, that energy flowers into new thoughts that will lead to action, whether that be fiction, e-book, or post. The allowance of reflection creates the urge to produce rather than the need to produce/ I am working on a compendium and will put it up soon; but a few suggestions for reflection: ‘Bird by Bird’ by Anne Lamott, “Word Painting” by Rebecca McClanahan, “Writing Fiction” 5th ed., by Janet Burroway, or “The Art & Craft of Fiction” by Victoria Mixon. Far more if you wish to write me about a specific problem, I can hone in on the book that emphasizes that but those are all wonderful. Also, it’s a gift when you read the words of prolific writers as they write of their craft. Currently, Steven King’s “On Writing” is one I’m reading (though it’s more reflection than specific structure; still fabulous. Let me know how it’s going. Can you send me your url? It’s not showing up on the leader board.

  4. universeocean

    I must commend you, Lee. Both for being so open about your illness as well as writing through a tough situation. But I guess if we didn’t write when life was tough we’d hardly write at all!

    My biggest hurdle to writing is currently my health. I suffer from a condition that causes chronic back/neck pain. Most days sitting at a desk is just pure torture, but not writing is just as terror-laden. I’ve tried to circumvent this problem by running my computer through my tv, using a wireless keyboard/mouse, etc., but even that doesn’t allow me to write as much as I’d like.

    Anyway, hope you’re out of the hospital. And quit passing out on sidewalks…even bums know you’re supposed to pass out in the gutter *next to* the sidewalk! 😉

    1. Lee Jenna Tyler

      Thanks for the tips; didn’t know the bum rule! =) I also have a bad back. I was bone on bone and borrowed a cane to keep working only to have emergency surgery and fusion through abdomen that now needs fixing. It is the auto-immune process eating into the bone marrow/and the r.a. So I write laying down w/wireless printer (hidden in dining room), wireless keyboard (that is a hassle to plug in. i just need to get an astronauts pen as I can’t write on paper laying down!!! Best of luck to you!

  5. Art Epicurean

    Yes, the creative urge seeps out and needs to be recognized even when it is inconvenient,or through recuperation…. You rock! Glad to hear you are home and OK. How scarey.

    1. leejtyler Post author

      Oh of all people to talk of creativity. I have to say again just how much I love your website. It’s food for my eyes. Such absolute beauty. And you are sharing your gifts with others through classes and video. You are the one that rocks, my dear!

  6. Coach Comeback

    That is some total dedication/love Lee. Are you sure you should not be resting =-)

    The biggest hurdle I have with writing is the fact that I self edit so darn much that I never think it is good enough… which leads to most of my work never getting published! I could probably write 4 books, fill 7 blogs and 2 James Patterson books with all the unpublished material I have.

    How do you deal with that?

    1. Lee Jenna Tyler

      Hi there! That, my dear, is a two-edged sword. We need to self-edit as we write but it is best to do the writing first and let your writing hand and sub-conscience work as one. That, of course, is the rough draft. Rough as in, it is not to be seen by anyone but you. Once you put it away and do something to get your mind off of that: hiking, biking, cleaning dishes, then you can come back with your self-editing cap on and change the whole thing around. Each go around with the rough draft will help you to add things, delete things that currently don’t work, or change a word here or there. Remember in this phase not to rely on your auto-spell check as it will not be your friend. Please check out this link for help:. http://selfeditingblog.com/self-editing-vs-pro-editing/985

Any thoughts on this? What is your opinion?