Skyrocket Awareness of Your Book with These Resources

book marketing

Please note: None of the books suggested are affiliate links as the state in which I live does not allow Amazon (or their affiliates/sellers) Affiliates operating within its borders.

I have received a number of requests for information regarding the methods of self-publishing; specifically as it applies to the editing, a compilation process, book-cover design and marketing of a self-published work. Even authors who have gone through the process have questions and doubts themselves.book marketing

Today, the publishing world looks very much like the Wild, Wild West. See Porter Anderson’s report at Ether for Authors and a list of articles on the heated publishing debates at Publishing Perspectives.  This is evidenced by The New York Times’ Best-Seller List (June 20th, 2013). Authors who are generally published through traditional publishers are now choosing to self-publish at will. Vanity Press is now an antiquated term.

Note that authors are pressed to do all of the online presence and social media through traditional publishing as well, but the rights are at issue here. Traditional publishers have the beneficial heft to push for additional rights for audio and oversees publishing. If that is what you see as important in your overall plan, you might want to take that into account

Susanne Lakin has a fantastic article at Live, Write, Thrive by guest author Dineen Miller, who writes about creative ways to market your book. If you are a longtime reader of this site, you will understand why I appreciate new ways of marketing for authors.  The article will get your creative juices flowing thinking of all of the articles you can write for various magazines or online before and after your book is published. That link again is at Live, Write, Thrive.

I have followed Jane Friedman since she was the editor of Writer’s Digest. She then went to teaching in Cincinnati and also for Writer’s Digest University as well as lecturing  out at writing seminars, starting her own blog in the process. A few years ago she was called up to the Virginia Quarterly Review though somehow she still writes for her website and teaches at Writer’s Digest webinars and conferences. Recently, she has compiled a Self-Publishing toolbox, of sorts, with everything a person could possibly hope for in one nifty package. This is basically a book itself, though she will drill about the ramifications of blogging your book.  Do not miss Jane’s massive compendium How to Publish an E-book.

Joel Friedlander, of The Book Designer , just guest posted for her. His whole webpage is amazing but the posts that shine for me are the following:

52 Great Blogs for Self-Publishers

5 Keys to Pain-Free Book Promotion

The greatest asset an author has to help them navigate the unknown waters of self-publishing is the accumulated wisdom of people who’ve been there before. I’ve always been impressed by how friendly the independent book publishing community is.

And BiblioCrunch has some great book designer; a direct quote from Joel himself. They also have some great article on their site:

Common Mistakes Indie and SelfPub Authors Make

Self-Publishing Costs; the Ultimate Guide

 Dan Blank We Grow Media has published a book that is all about marketing and building a writer’s platform A Writer’s Guide to Blogging.

He also has a great post on his blog about author Hugh Howey who is the now famous indie author of the Wool series. It is worth clicking over for a great read.

Please take note of Dan Blank’s static front page. This is the portal to his website, but I think it’s a great way to market your book. You will see when you click on the link. Study what he has done, as he is a leader in the media industry.

If you would like a more interactive approach to setting out your promotional plan, Writer’s Digest University is the place to go. Writer’s Digest University Self Publishing Tutorials You can get a monthly membership to review all of their tutorials for $25 per month. If you do not want to be charged for the next month, do be advised that you must cancel prior to the next billing cycle. This is a ticket to a wealth of information on all levels of Writer’s Digest University.

Laura Pepper-Wu is the co-founder of 30 Day Books: a book studio. She has worked with a variety of authors to successfully promote their books, including many Amazon best-sellers. Laura is the author of wedding non-fiction guides and book marketing guides 77 Ways to Find New Readers for Your Self-Published Book.

Laura also runs Ladies Who Critique, a critique-partner finding site. When she’s not working at the studio, you can find her walking her dog, “yoga-ing” or at a coffee shop in Seattle.

You might like:

Laura Pepper Wu’s 30 Day Books, taken from her ideal book marketing course. While the class is not in session now, you can get on the watch list by clicking here

What is more; there is a link to a WordPress theme designed especially for authors to promote their books. It’s priceless. Or nearly so compared to hiring a designer and paying a webmaster as well as hosting, security, e-commerce themes, et cetera. The theme is called Authorlicious.

I have several author friends who are in search of a good designer for their books and I have sent them most of this material and more (including tips from one author to another, which is why it is a good idea to get into a group of authors not only for support, but sound advise. That is what this website is about and all of what I am about

I just found a plethora of books for author platform building on Goodreads. A five starred book by Shelley Hitz at Self-PublishingCoach website is available for you at a single click.  Check out her site to see what else she has to offer.

 One of the books on the list is David Graughran’s Let’s Get Digital which I have lined up in my Kindle. This man knows what he is discussing as he’s been through the mill and understands all of the machinations.

In fact, if you are interested in what David has to say, you can register for a free webinar that ALLi is putting on through Shindigs right here. It is set for June 27, 2013 @ 9:00 pm – 10:30 pm and I’m sure will prove to be an informative and enjoyable 90 minutes. Sign up today and put it on your calendar. ALLi (Alliance for Independent Authors) includes founder Orna Ross and is advised by all of my favorite people in the world of books. Jane Freidman, Joel Friedlander Mark Coker (Smashwords), The ever alert Victoria Strauss (Writer Beware), Joanna Penn and Passive Guy, David Vandagriff, Karen Lotter, among others. If you are going to publish as an indie, I would suggest signing up for their newsletter. All very good advise as is evidenced above.

Topics for the blog are scheduled as follows:

Mon: Author-Publishing News   (Updates, Press Releases, ALLi News)Tue: Opinion   (On Publishing, Writing and the Indie Business)Wed: Member Showcase   (Our Members’ Latest Books and Events)Thu: Advice on Writing   (Productivity, Motivation, Craft)Fri: Advice on Publishing   (Editing, Formatting, Printing)Sat: Advice on Reaching Readers   (Marketing & Promotion)Sunday: How I Do It   (Self-Publishing Success Stories)

For instance, I found this article in my in-box just today; There will now be clickable and searchable hashtags on Facebook which woke me up as I am more of the Twitter and Google Plus Communities girl though I am on Facebook. You enter searchable and clickable hashtags into the mix, and I look up from my writing. That’s a game-changer for me.

And Alli has addressed many of the concerns I have for the new world of publishing; for instance, the overseas rights which are normally handled through long-standing relationships with publishers. How are indie authors to branch out? Jennifer Custer answers this here, here  and has an update for you here.

Orma Ross addresses branching out here and links to Members Pack information which archives all forums from IndieReCon and also breaks down Members benefits according to the membership level. (You can also sign up for articles alone free of cost if you are strapped for cash at the moment. This is what I have done.)

The phenom of self-publishing, Amanda Hocking has secured another deal with St. Martin’s Press. See this New York Times article for details.

Speaking of platforms, Michael Hyatt whom you all know as a wonderful advocate of helping to develop your platform has started the Platform University which will guide you through all of the necessary factors that need to be addressed to set up your own platform.

If you are lost in looking for good editing services, cover design or formatting, BiblioCrunch, mentioned earlier, has a whole  set of tools and resources for you to pick and choose from according to your needs.  They are there to guide you through the process  with advisors that are trusted and know the publishing business and all that is involved. You can set your budget for proofreading, editing, design based on your budget. It’s a phenomenal service and one I think you will find very user-friendly and useful.

Along those lines, the Independent Book Publishers Association (IBPA) has a great list of editing, design and publishing services that are very helpful. With Board Members from Shelf Awareness to all sectors of the publishing and publishing news areas, there is a wealth of information on this site. Bookmark it and refer to it often.

Ann Hill, the Creative Content Coach has an article about creating Author Platforms that last.

And Bob Mayer, the Full-Time Author and former green beret and New York Times Best-Selling Author, has an information filled podcast detailing the “secret sauce” of book promotion. He has written over 50 books and just started the publishing company, Cool Gus Publishing, with author Jennifer Crusie. I had a hankering for writing a book on the incredible life of Bob Mayer. After reading about Jennifer Crusie, now I’ll have to write about both. Do you think Cool Gus Publishing would publish them?

Nick Thacker of LiveHacked has “The Official Self-Published Book Marketing Plan”. Yes, they wrote the book on it. 😉

And if you have written a memoir, in the non-fiction rubric, the National Association of Memoir Writers (NAMW) has a great article helping indie authors to create a platform using YouTube. Video content is the next wave, so get ready for your close-up.

A note on breaking indie author news: Amazon World, which   has signed the famous Wool series indie author, Hugh Howie, to work within their Kindle World projects. See all of the news on this up and coming market for indie authors.

[Update: I just got the Writer’s Digest Conference sign-up form in my inbox. Please go here to see all of the details.]

Coincidentally, the next person I was going to write about is featured on the left side of  the IndieReCon page. This woman is as dynamic as she is kind. Melissa Foster. Watch for her in upcoming issues of this series. There are quite a few resources for your platform and articles and events (and explosions) that I still have left to write about. Some mentioned in this article will be discussed further in upcoming posts.

Sign up for much more in this series on self-publishing. Just add your email to the right top field and I will deliver it, sans spam, to your inbox.

Please leave a comment on any issues you are having as a self-published author and I would be more than happy to cover them.

This post is featured in Carol Tice’s Link Party. Check it out for great articles on writing, freelancing and productivity!

Closet Word Geek’s Predictions Come True

I am a closet word geek. I have a Google Drive Document with predictions on common usage words, and when they will become official; in other words, inked into a dictionary. This announcement is not earth shattering news but the following is quite shocking in the annuals of lexiconic rules.
oxford english disctionary

GalleyCat has just announced in an article by Jason Boog that the Oxford English Dictionary has added “tweet’ and ‘crowdsourcing’ to its lexicon.

OED Chief Editor, John Simpson (pictured above), wrote an article about the two new additions. The source of the words is always something a geek is interested in, and Mr. Simpson understands this. He attributed ‘crowdsourcing’ to the author of a WIRED article by Jeff Howe which was published in 2006.

Concerning other words that would be relegated to the Urban Dictionary, the OED has already adopted words that, are far less used than ‘tweet’, in my opinion. As Jason Boog notes in GalleyCat:

AllTwitter has more about the Twitter additions to the dictionary:

The OED added the word “tweetable” to its listing in February 2013, and “retweet” in August 2011. Other tech terms in this round of 1,200 newly revised and updated words, bringing the OED’s total number of entries to more than 823,000

As a sidenote, I worked with the man who brought the well-known word ‘blogosphere’ to our English lexicon. Brad Graham was his name and sadly he is no longer with us, passing at a young age. But he will always be remembered for his wit and his word-usage. Wikipedia will always have him in its archives.

History [edit]

The term was coined on September 10, 1999 by Brad L. Graham, as a joke.[1][2] It was re-coined in 2002 by William Quick,[3] and was quickly adopted and propagated by the warblog community. The term resembles the older word logosphere (from Greek logos meaning word, and sphere, interpreted as world), “the world of words”, the universe of discourse.[4][5]

Despite the term’s humorous intent, CNN, the BBC, and National Public Radio‘s programs Morning EditionDay To Day, and All Things Considered have used it several times to discuss public opinion. A number of media outlets in recent years have started treating the blogosphere as a gauge of public opinion, and it has been cited in both academic and non-academic work as evidence of rising or falling resistance to globalizationvoter fatigue, and many other phenomena,[6] and also in reference to identifying influential bloggers[7] and “familiar strangers” in the blogosphere.[8][9]

 

Displays interconnections throughout the all blogsThe Blogoshere, Image cred: Wikipedia

The Wikipedia article is full of great information for word geeks and tech geeks, of which I fall into both groups. Please say a silent hello to Brad when you read it. You would have loved his sense of humor. He saved many a staff meeting from lack of levity.

I can only hope that the spellcheckers are updated accordingly as I am tired of convincing the apps that crowdsourcing is indeed a word.

What word do you wish would finally be moved into the Oxford English Dictionary? Leave your comments below.

How the Ebook Revolution Compares to Another Great Revolution

publication changes

where are we in the digital culture?

 

I have been thinking recently about the twists and turns the music industry took when they had their great revolution; what we would now term, I imagine Music 2.0.

Remember Napster?

Back in the days of dial-up modems, the sound of the dial up modem wasn’t music to anyone’s ear, I don’t suppose, but I found the revolving triangle of the Netscape browser somewhat calming.

What wasn’t calming was the fear that the big music industry titans unleashed on music lovers when the lawsuits became frontpage news (when we bought the paper and got ink on our hands for reading it). There were more than several cases that were used to be an example for the Everyday Joe who ‘stole’ some billion dollar figure from music producers and performers every month and struck the fear into everyone on the world wide web. Yes, that’s what we called it in my day and we used all three words, as well.

Now, I wasn’t an offender, and I would swear this in a court of law,  because being an artist and working in the industry myself, I had a special affinity for those that produced any art in any medium and didn’t get fair-recompense. I didn’t go all medieval on the friends that downloaded music, but I sympathized with the artists that were not getting the paychecks they would get otherwise.

 

But this can go two ways.

A lot of the problem back then was one great behemoth of an organization that took over the music industry. It didn’t allow for free market competition and allow the markets to even themselves out in the economic climate. It was known as BMI. We’ve all seen the talk that Laurence Lessing gave at Ted with the overpowering support the courts give to new innovations.

 

How does this relate to writing?

Well we are going through another sort of revolution in the publishing industry with ebooks, and it’s been going on for some time.  We don’t have a behemoth industry to compare to BMI though some would call Amazon that giant, but there are plenty of other corporations that have the capacity to overtake them. It’s been done before. People can argue, and win in their minds, both ways when it  comes to the pros and cons of Amazon.

And yet, every minute the landscape changes. See what BitLit has to say in the latest salvo here.

I think this is a fantastic idea and would like to see how it works. now logistically the writers publisher if it is a trad pub would have to set up (and pay for) ISBNs for all version: print, digital, audio and of course there are the markets outside of your particular nation; these would have to be coordinated as well. And this is just off the cuff thinking; there is surely much more cost and arranging for this idea to work be feasible.

What do you think of what BitLit has to offer? Comment below.

This is part of a multi-part series on indie publications or self-publications is coming up this week. Sign up if you are interested.

The Story Cartel Course Starts on Monday, June 10th! Hurry!

what's best way to learn to write

what's best way to learn to writeThe Story Cartel Course starts on Monday, June 10th!

But if you hurry, you can sign up and get in. Hit the logo to the right of this post. If it is full, then at least you can get on their waiting list. You don’t want to miss this door to your writing life and future book promotion success! What is it, you ask? Let’s let Joe Bunting answer that question in his words.

The Best Way to Become a Full-Time Writer

“How do you become a full-time writer?” That’s a question I hear all the time.Three years ago, I quit my day job and achieved something most writers only fantasize about: I became a full time writer.

It wasn’t easy though. While I enjoyed the chance to do what I loved, I lived on pennies for the first year. Since then, I’ve talked to NY Times Bestselling authors, editors at major publishing houses, successful freelance journalists, and even a few full-time bloggers. I’ve discovered a few secrets—and started powerful habits—that have helped me support my family and my art.

Whether you want to be a full-time writer or just want to share your art with the world, the Story Cartel Course will help you increase your audience, create industry connections, and build a strong foundation for your writing career.

A Strong Foundation to Your Writing Career.

The publishing world is changing. Publishers are going out of business, and many authors are having a harder time making a living. But the same market forces that are causing the demise of publishing as we know it are making it even easier to build your audience, launch your writing, and ultimately start a strong writing career. In this eight-week course, we will learn how to thrive as a writer in an ever changing publishing industry. 

The Story Cartel Course Includes

Practical Inspiration
Eight weeks of lessons on how to write, publish, and market your stories. Even the shyest writers can market their writing and sell more books.

Expert Teaching
Glean publishing wisdom from 11 guest experts, including Amazon bestselling authors, book cover designers, and award winning bloggers. Learn the secrets of publishing success from the best.

A Thriving Community
Join a supportive community of fellow writers and authors. You’ll receive support, encouragement, and critiques on your writing from the Story Cartel community.

Special Access to Author Tools
Get special access to Story Cartel’s tools to reach our community of thousands of readers. Story Cartel is a platform to help authors build their audience, get more reviews, and ultimately sell more books.

 

See this site for more information on The Story Cartel itself. But for a run down, here is a brief synopsis:

What Is Story Cartel?


Story Cartel is a new way for readers and authors to connect.

This is a home to any kind of book you could imagine, from nail-biting thrillers to tender romance novels, serious literary fiction to self-help non-fiction. Story Cartel is full of books that are read and discovered by people like you. Since October 2012, over 70 books have been downloaded and read by over 6,300 readers, generating more than 1,000 reviews on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads, and blogs. Thousands of readers are connecting with new authors right now.

Every book is free for a limited time.

The books you see on Story Cartel are all offered free by generous authors in exchange for your honest review. For book lovers, Story Cartel is a resource to discover great books and fresh authors; for authors, it’s a platform to build deeper relationships with readers. As long as it meets our guidelines, any author can launch their book on Story Cartel.

Readers support authors by leaving their honest review.

All books on Story Cartel are completely free, but in return you support authors by leaving your honest review, whether good or bad, of the book you downloaded. Your reviews help authors market their books and gives them valuable feedback to improve their writing.

An update from the administrators of the course: Course registration starts on Monday June 10th and ends Sunday, June 16th. The course work will begin on Monday, June 17th.

 

Grab your virtual seat now by clicking on this link or above The Story Cartel Logo to the right of this page now!

Traditional Publishing Services Brought to Indie Authors

traditional publishing services brought to indie

This is a quick post for the multi-part series on Self-Publishing. An interesting take on the traditional vs. self-publishing option.

 

In their continuing efforts to support self-published authors, Digital Book World has spotlighted a service that brings the traditional publishing services to authors through Bowker.

If you buy your ISBN through Bowker, it will offer the promotional services of Smith Publicity.

As stated in the press release:

ProQuest affiliate Bowker® is expanding resources available to authors and small publishers on its MyIdentifiers.com website by teaming with Smith Publicity, widely recognized as one of the industry’s top book publicity agencies. Now, MyIdentifiers.com will include a link to Smith’s website where authors and publishers can take the first steps in exploring public relations programs that can effectively support their publishing efforts. The cooperation with Smith is part of Bowker’s larger program to help MyIdentifiers users succeed by connecting them to trusted providers of a range of essential services.